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Fire Safety

Burning in the Open

Across the City of Playford, different rules apply for different areas of our community — some areas require permits to burn out in the open, while in other areas burning is not permitted at all. The Environment Protection (Air Quality Policy) 2016 came into effect to boost the health of South Australians, our communities and the environment of the air we breathe.

The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) policy highlights a number of changes to allowable burning activities in the Playford community. See what permit you require in your area below.

Burning Permit Areas
General Burning Permit area boundaries

Burning Permits

If you are in the blue zone of the map above, you may conduct burn-offs for bushfire prevention under the City of Playford General Notice Burning Permit without applying for an individual permit, as long as they follow conditions of the General Notice. If you are burning for agricultural or horticultural purposes, you must obtain a permit.

If you are in the green zone of the map, a Burning Permit can be issued by Council under certain circumstances.

Burning Permits helps ensure the safety of not just those doing the burning, but the neighbours and community which surrounds them. Permits make sure burning is done within the rules and regulations, and assists in bushfire prevention to reduce the amount of fuel that could catch fire in an emergency.

Due to the extension of Fire Danger Season until 12 May 2019, applications for Burning Permits will made available from 6 May 2019.

If preparing for a burning permit please be aware of the following conditions.

A person carrying out an approved burning activity must:

  • only burn between the hours of 10am and 5pm, Monday to Saturday. NB: Burning on Sundays and Public Holidays is prohibited.
  • create piles of a maximum 3m x 3m x 2m size
  • notify your neighbours prior to the day of burn
  • place materials to be burnt in a position that allows for a four-metre clearance around and over the fire
  • ensure all piles to be burnt are not in close proximity to other flammable materials including grass and logs
  • burn one pile at a time, to ensure that you retain control of each burn
  • have appropriate working fire control equipment on standby
  • extinguish the fire immediately if smoke or odour is causing a nuisance on another person’s property
  • stay within the direct vicinity of the immediate burn site if smoke or smoulder is coming off of the burn
  • ensure the fire is completely extinguished on the completion of the burn.

You must not: Burn materials mixed into soil or permapine treated with copper arsenate, household rubbish, plastic or rubber.

Burning Permit Frequently Asked Questions

Can I still have a campfire in the course of camping, scouting or a similar outdoor recreational activity?

No, residents are no longer permitted as of 23 July 2016. Council may grant permits in extenuating circumstances.

Can I still burn agricultural or forestry waste?

Yes, with Council approval through individual permit or general notice published in a newspaper.

Will I still be able to burn off for bushfire hazard reduction?

Yes, with Council approval through individual permit or general notice published in a newspaper.

What if there's a total fire ban over the Christmas period - can I still use my BBQ?

If you are planning on using a solid-fuel BBQ, and the forecast is for a day of Total Fire Ban (TFB), then you will need to be prepared to change your plans to use either electric or gas-fuelled BBQs, or even cook inside.

As Council offices will be closed after 21st December, there will be no Fire Prevention Officer available to issue a permit for a TFB.

Can I use a fire for the preparation of food and beverages?

Yes, there's no permit or permission required. The fire must be restricted to a size adequate for the preparation of food or beverage.

Can I use a brazier, chiminea or a fire pit for outdoor domestic heating?

Yes, there's no permit or permission required. Fuel is restricted to charcoal only.

Council’s Role in an Emergency

As part of Council's ongoing responsibility to community safety, we follow the four phases of Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery (PPRR).

  • Prevention - measures taken to eliminate or reduce the severity of emergencies
  • Preparedness - the arrangements to ensure that, should an emergency occur, all the resources and services which are needed to cope with the effects can be efficiently mobilised and deployed
  • Response - the actions taken in anticipation of, during, and immediately after an emergency, to ensure that its effects are minimised, and that people affected are given immediate relief and support
  • Recovery - the coordinated process of supporting affected communities in reconstruction of the built environment and the restoration of emotional, social, economic, built and natural environment wellbeing

City of Playford is a member of the following committees:

  • Adelaide Mount Lofty Ranges Bushfire Management Committee
  • Northern Adelaide Zone Emergency Management Committee