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DV support and training

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DV support and training
Published 19 February 2017
Education is key to helping domestic violence victims, according to an expert who delivered training to local people last week.

Education is key to helping domestic violence victims, according to an expert who delivered training to local people last week.

^^ Colin discussing the difficulties domestic violence victims face when trying to leave a relationship. It can take an average of seven attempts to leave an abusive relationship, reflecting the challenges faced by those who experience domestic violence. This is a startling statistic faced by 33 per cent of Australian women, which was revealed at a DV-Alert training session held at the Stretton Centre by Colin Drew from Lifeline this week. Mr Drew has been a counsellor for almost 13 years and has worked closely with people experiencing domestic violence and child abuse.

“Many people are unaware DV isn't just physical,” Mr Drew said.“It can be financial, social, emotional or anything that is power and control over your human rights."

The free session, provided by Lifeline, educates individuals and service providers about the difficulties of domestic violence. Renee Kellaway provides support to families experiencing domestic violence and benefited from the course.

“I help the client through their first 48 hours after leaving, so this course is very important to me (a service provider) as I gain understanding and confidence to act accordingly,” Ms Kellaway said. “The majority of clients tend to be female but I do also have male clients needing assistance."

Lifeline regularly holds free sessions, including multicultural support training.

You can find out more in booking a session by heading to: www.dvalert.org.au

If you need support contact:

1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732)- Nation-wide free call

Lifeline 131 114 - Cost of a local call.

DV gateway - 1300 782 200 (business hours) OR 1800 800 098 (24 hours 7 days)