Skip to main content

10 mental health thoughts

News
10 mental health thoughts
Published 5 October 2017
A forum for people dealing with mental and physical health issues, Carnival in the North, will be hosted by the City of Playford on October 11.

A forum for people dealing with mental and physical health issues, Carnival in the North, will be hosted by the City of Playford on October 11.Ahead of that event, mental health worker Dallas, shares 10 thoughts about mental health – they come from her personal experience.Carnival in the North will be held at the Playford Civic Centre on Wednesday, October 11. Dallas is now employed with Uniting Communities Mental Health Service as a peer support worker.Speaking from her own mental health experience, Dallas is now sharing her knowledge with others and will be involved in supporting Carnival in the North.

10 mental health thoughts

Depression and anxiety doesn’t always look the way it is depicted on television.

Your finances are a mess, your idea of cooking is a toasted-cheese sandwich or two-minute noodles, and your immune system is non-existent.

There can be multiple 'reasons' why someone has depression and anxiety, or there can be absolutely none at all.

Having a mental illness is not a death sentence, it is not something to be ashamed or scared of.

The reality is it’s not easy. It is challenging to, firstly, trust yourself enough to be who you are and acknowledge your illness to yourself.

Yes, there were the people who told me it was all in my head, and I assumed everyone else would have the same reaction. I was wrong. There were far more people who acknowledged and supported me in my recovery.

In addition to keeping you physically fit, regular exercise can be an important tool for managing your mental illness. Research has shown that exercise releases the feel-good chemicals in your brain, such as endorphins and serotonin, which helps lower depression levels.

You can start small: three 10-minute walks, push the kids on a swing, or weed the garden.

It’s not been an overnight process. It has been close to eight years and I still have bad days - that will probably never change.

I focus on the things I do have the power to change. I may not like that I have a mental illness, what has happened in my life, what is happening, or what my options are, but I still need to make a decision in order to live my life in the best way that I can. Choosing not to do anything, is still a decision.

For more information about Carnival in the North, click HERE. Dallas has completely opened up about the challenges and successes of her mental health experience – to read her full story, click HERE.